The best iPad Pro cases for your Apple tablet

It’s been over a year since Apple launched the iPad Pro 9.7, complementing its even-older plus-sized 12.9-inch model with a more on-the-move friendly sibling that doesn’t compromise on power.

Both of these slates are still powerfully popular, and the larger one has even been refreshed with the new iPad Pro 12.9 (2017), which handily fits the same cases as the original iPad Pro 12.9.

With that in mind we've created this list of the best cases – with and without keyboards – for your 9.7-inch or 12.9-inch pro-grade Apple slate.

You'll find cases of all different styles and fit for all different budgets, most of which are available for both size iPads. The one thing they all have in common is that they're all great.

Note: we've ranked these from cheapest to most expensive according to prices at time of writing. We also plan to have a selection of iPad Pro 10.5 cases enter this list in the coming weeks.

  • Looking for an iPad Pro keyboard case? Check out our full guide to the best here

If the decision to go iPad Pro left you shorn of a few quid too many, then this tan PU leather case from Mofred is a no-brainer purchase. Its dark matt outer finish looks and feels a lot more expensive than it is, as does the tan inner microfibre lining inside.

The case neatly flips into a portrait or landscape stand with three grades of angle and the magnetic strip sleeps/wakes your iPad Pro on closing/opening. A pouch on the outside is just big enough for a few key A4 documents; Mofred even tucked in a screen protector to boot.

Overall this case is a great way to keep your premium device safe from everyday knocks and bumps without coughing up a lot more cash for the convenience.

There's something about Incipio's Octane Pure case that just feels fun. It has a rubbery impact-absorbing TPU bumper that's well-molded around the ports and buttons, and it runs around a transparent plastic shell that shows off the rear of your tablet.

The flip-over cover has a suede microfiber lining that does its bit to shield the screen, and it also folds up as a dual-angle kickstand for media viewing and typing.

With a vegan leather cover suitable for those fond of our four-legged friends, the case comes in black as well as crazy blue, pink and purple candy colors.

The magnetic lock on this slim case is probably the strongest we've come across and handily puts the iPad Pro to sleep at a close, as all Smart Covers should. The variable-angle stand is a bit flimsy if you tend to jab your device's screen, but users with a light touch should find it adequate.

VRS Design calls it a 'leather case' but it's actually lined in PU leather, which is a split leather backing covered with a layer of polyurethane.

Whether or not that's a minus is down to personal preference – we haven't had it long enough to cast judgement on its durability in the long term. Otherwise the case feels soft, it's good-looking and offers easy access to ports and buttons.

Another case that lets you show the world you’ve got great tablet taste, even if you’ve plumped for the rose gold tablet, Speck’s SmartShell Plus lets you make the most of the iPad’s looks as well as its core grunt and solid combination of work and play-friendly abilities.

Showing off your iPad's color while keeping it safe from everyday knocks and scratches, the transparent rear sports cut-outs in all the right places, with openings for Lightning connector, speaker and camera, volume buttons, plus a gap along the side that lets you pair the case with Apple's own Smart Keyboard.

Reinforced edges and corners keep everything safe from drops without adding unwanted bulk to your pleasingly slimline slate.

There are iPad Pro 9.7 cases, and then there is this, a bag specifically designed for your tablet. A luxurious one at that, having been crafted from genuine leather.

It has a wallet-size pocket on the outside and a classy case for your Apple Pencil, while the soft sleeve has all the right cut-outs, the sleep/wake smart function works as advertised, and the case folds over for ideal typing and viewing angles.

The inner pockets mean it's not the slimmest case by any stretch, but it's elegant while also providing fine protection. The shoulder strap is a welcome touch for those regularly on the move, whilst a variety of fun colors will appease those tired of the classic brown leather look.

We've seen Pipetto's Origami case for a number of iOS device models and its design never fails to impress. This version for the Pro user comes in a variety of stylish colours (the royal blue is particularly striking) and feels unique, thanks to Pipetto's use of soft PU for the outer shell and a furry suedette lining making things snuggly inside.

It's not unlike Apple's own Smart Cover for the iPad Pro, and even turns the device on/off when opened/closed; the difference is that the Origami has a rear flap that folds into four stand modes all of which offer an alternative viewing angle depending on your needs (typing, viewing etc). We like.

If you've owned a Gumdrop case before then this should be familiar territory. The Hideaway boasts the company's classic impact resistant dual-layer silicone/polycarbonate design with reinforced corrugated rubber bumpers around the edges of the screen for uber-protection.

There's also a built-in kickstand on the back that adjusts to viewing or typing modes.

What won't be so familiar perhaps is the neat Apple Pencil 'pocket' that sits lengthways at one corner and has two holes, one to stand up the input device when you're busy typing and another for sliding it in parallel to the case when you're on the move. Super handy!

It’s fine to show off your inner nerd, and we don’t just mean with a fun background on your super slate. This R2-D2-inspired Casetify offering is ideal for any hardened Star Wars fan.

It’s about more than mere fun factor though. The Saffiano leather body offers a durable protective coating that’s as hardwearing as it is easy on the eye, while a reinforced plastic inlay gently hugs your tablet and keeps it safe from drops.

It’s versatile too, with four different stand positions letting you optimize your tablet’s position to your current needs, be that typing, movie watching or a nice session with your Pencil in hand.

The iPad Pro is a simply stunning bit of kit. As much as you want to protect it from the rigors of daily life then, it feels a shame to hamper its good looks by wrapping it in a mass of plastic, rubber or leather. The OtterBox Statement helps keep your prized tech possession safe and secure without cramping its sleek lines.

While the case’s slimline body is finished with black, blue or maroon genuine-leather accents, the clear polycarbonate rear panel keeps your tablet’s effortless elegance on display.

That’s not all, reinforced rubber corners help boost the case’s drop-protection credentials, while a slightly lipped front keeps that stunning, Pencil-friendly screen safe from face-down fumbles.

Waterfield's zippered Travel Express Case is a stowaway's dream: it can store a charging cable with plug attached, an Apple Pencil, and even a Smart Keyboard alongside your iPad Pro, all with room to spare for earbuds etc. You don't have to worry about damaging your gear either, as soft-lined pockets keep each item safely separated.

The waxed bag is beautifully made, and with a self-locking zipper to keep things inside and an optional strap available, it's a great solution if you're often on the move. Sure, it's weighty when full, but the excellent design and fit keeps bulk to a bare minimum.

If you often struggle to angle your iPad's screen using the fixed positions of typical stand cases then Logitech has the ideal solution.

Inside the rear of this hard case is a smooth-glide hinge with a 60-degree range that sits dead centre of your iPad: just snap your device into the top fixture and bring the screen down to the desired angle and it stays put, even against the poke of heavy-handed tappers.

The hard rubberised fabric on the outside of the case feels plenty protective, with decent-sized slots for button access. It even has Smart Cover smarts, so the screen sleeps and wakes when you open/close it.

Traditional bookbindery finds another home in this handcrafted case, which features an elastic loop that holds an Apple Pencil securely when not in use. A sturdy plastic tray inside keeps your iPad in place and protects the edges when closed without hindering access to ports and buttons.

The case is described as multi-angle, but the stand can't quite take the weight of an iPad Pro and tends to slide down into the default position (which is fine in itself). All in all, it's a heavy old thing, but offers solid defence for your Apple device.

As much as you’d like to keep your iPad Pro’s sleek lines and metal body on show for the world to see, sometimes hardcore device-saving protection needs to come before style.

That doesn’t mean you have to completely do away with easy-on-the-eye appeal though. Griffin’s all-terrain Survivor case offers plenty of protection while letting you custom color the case to your tastes.

Despite boasting a relatively slim profile, this hardy add-on offers protection from drops up to 6.6 feet, making it ideal for the ultra-clumsy or those using their tablets in unforgiving environments. The defenses continue inside, too, with a foam-lined polycarbonate frame that's shatter-resistant and encased in silicone.

A Touch ID-friendly built-in screen protector and plugs for all the ports finish the look, while ensuring dirt, sand and rain have no easy route in. What’s more, an included clip-on stand for hands-free use makes your iPad Pro ready for whatever nature, or you, can throw at it.

The iPad Pro is a professional bit of kit, so it’s time to treat it as such. Knomo’s Full Wrap Folio case doesn’t just give the device a business-ready full-grain leather makeover, it also boasts a couple of business card holder slots on the inside cover.

This isn’t a case just for on-the-move estate agents though. While a smooth internal microfiber lining will help prevent your tablet’s screen succumbing to scuffs and scratches, the case’s folding, lipped design means it can double as a stand.

This is perfect whether you’re looking to enjoy a relaxing video viewing session or pair your tablet with a separate Bluetooth keyboard for quicker typing.

Available in black, gold and rose gold, as a helpful finishing touch every Knomo case comes with a unique identifying code too, so, once registered, if you ever misplace your prized possession those honest folks who stumble across it can easily get it back to you. Aren't people nice.

This is more of a sleeve than a case, so it protects your iPad Pro when you're not using it. With that out of the way, know this: Joli design is a thing to behold. The full grain waxed leather of this made-to-order product feels and smells delightful, and twinned with the wool inner lining really looks the part.

The fit feels tight at first, but after a bit of use we found the sleeve relaxed just a little and sliding an iPad Pro in and out soon required less force. The impeccable stitching kept the device more than secure though, so we can't fault it. It might not be cheap, but it's the loveliest handcrafted case we've seen.

This slender case is cloaked in a traditional bookbinding material called Buckram, which makes a satisfying crack like the well-worn spine of an archive journal when you fold it over into the stand position.

Two sturdy ridges in the opposing soft-grip liner offer two comfy viewing angles, while the clean-release 3M adhesive holds in your iPad Pro nice and securely.

The on/off magnetic smart cover is kept closed with a Moleskine band and does a fair job of protecting the device's edges. The outward indent of the fold is prone to wear but ends up adding to the overall vintage library book feel. A fine case indeed.

Moleskine is an iconic brand famed for making luxurious paper pads that truly stand the test of time and travel. While your iPad might have replaced those traditional paper innards, this luxurious iPad Pro case means you can still benefit from the same combination of style and hardiness.

Offering uncompromising daily protection, the black polyurethane case is finished with a soft microfiber inlay to keep your slate’s screen and sleek metal lines safe from scuffs and scratches.

Beyond ticking all the right knock and drop saving boxes, this case is about more than being a sophisticated, easy on the eye option.

As well as featuring Moleskine’s signature elastic band closing mechanism, the case doubles as a handy tablet stand and even comes with an inbuilt loop to keep your Apple Pencil from disappearing when not in use.

While Apple’s official keyboard case is impressive, it’s not perfect. Not only will its price tag give your already depleted wallet another sizeable kick in the bits, but there’s nowhere to store your Apple Pencil when not in use. Don’t worry though, that’s where Logitech’s effort comes in.

Utilizing the iPad’s Smart Connector, this keyboard case boasts backlit keys for improved after dark typing, while a special Pencil loop will keep your additional iPad accessory safe and secure.

More than just a rapid response email enabler, the case, which comes in black, blue or red, offers hearty tablet protection, both front and back, and will auto wake your iPad when opened.

While it won’t drain your tablet’s battery, only drawing power when placed in a typing position, keys assigned specifically to utilize a number of key iOS features have been slotted in, bonus.

When it comes to iPad protection, Apple, having designed the slate itself, has a solid starting point for keeping it safe. While its Smart Cover is a classic and the rear-protecting Silicone Case the best for protecting against bumps, it’s the official Smart Keyboard case that’s arguably Apple’s best iPad Pro accessory.

As well as protecting the screen from scratches when chucked in your bag, the case fits in its own physical QWERTY keyboard, transforming your powerful tablet into a true laptop replacement.

The keyboard-enhanced case isn’t just about being able to knock out email replies or last-minute work documents in double-quick fashion either. When work’s done, it can transform into a tablet stand, letting you enjoy a hands-free Netflix binge.

  • Now power up your slate with the best iPad Pro accessories

Nvidia vs AMD: which should be your next graphics card?

While console gaming sees the rivalry between PS4 Pro vs Xbox One X, PC gamers are equally zealous about the conflict of Nvidia vs AMD, the two top  graphics card companies . Unfortunately, if you don’t pledge brand loyalty to either of these companies, it’s easy to get left behind in the arms race between these two. 

As 2017 comes to a close, competition in the GPU space is especially heated. The Nvidia GeForce 10 series, based on the Pascal architecture, debuted in May of last year and is showing no signs of stopping. After all, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti just came out, so we wouldn’t count on seeing the next-generation Volta cards until 2018 at the earliest – and Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang has said as much 

On the other end of the spectrum, AMD has Vega. Serving as the long-awaited follow-up to the Fury-riddled Polaris architecture of years past, the Advanced Micro Devices company’s latest graphics cards have only been out since August of this year. 

So with both options here to stay, let’s take a look at the differences they both offer – from their initial costs, to the performance they exhibit, to their software and features, drivers and the often messily conceived exclusivity deals you’ll find out there.

nvidia vs amd

There are graphics card choices for days

Price

We’ve all been on Reddit (or, at the very least, read the comments section on a tech website before). AMD is widely known for its affordability, for better or for worse. But are the rumors true? 

Well, certain benchmarks would lead us to believe that the AMD Radeon RX Vega 56, which sells for $419 on Amazon (about £320, AU$543) right now, is a better performer than the $449 (about £344, AU$582) Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070. Admittedly, this isn’t a massive price difference, but it is indicative of what you can expect from both Nvidia and AMD at the mid-range.

Go higher and you’ll find that the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 is most comparable to the AMD Radeon Vega 64. At an MSRP (manufacturer’s suggested retail price) level, both of these cost about the same. This is, of course, intentional on both companies’ parts. 

After revealing its 4K-focused GTX 1080 Ti earlier this year, the Green Team was keen on dropping the price of the 1080 in the process. So that card went from an MSRP of $599 down to $499. Before long, AMD was putting the Vega 64 onto store shelves at the same price. 

Across the board, AMD and Nvidia graphics cards both cost about the same relative to their respective performance benchmarks. Our pick of the best graphics card overall, the GTX 1060, is exactly the same price as the AMD Radeon RX 580, and in the budget space, the RX 560 can be found for the same price as the GTX 1050. 

Ultimately, who has the better price is more dependent on where you can find a heavy discount. We’d suggest holding off for Black Friday for the most savings.

nvidia vs amd

Performance

When you’re trying to build a PC that’s more powerful than your arch-enemy’s, buying a graphics card isn’t a matter of price but performance. Packing the best performance for the lowest cost is the arguably the most pertinent factor in driving GPU sales. 

In recent years, AMD fans have lauded the Red Team for doing exactly that, but we’re not convinced they’re right anymore. Instead, bearing in mind the price parity that the two companies have loosely achieved, we digress, Nvidia is killing it. That’s even the case if you ignore that AMD has yet to produce a contender to the GTX 1080 Ti. 

To be fair, Vega has only been available for a few months now, and there was no GTX 1080 Ti equivalent at Pascal’s launch either. Still, the GTX 1080 shows the RX Vega 64 up in several different areas, such as multi-rendering and NBody calculation, whereas the RX Vega 64 is better at rendering texture details and complex shading. 

In other words, AMD and Nvidia are so close at this point that which is better is more of a matter of what games you play and at what resolution. As we reported back in October, the Vega 64 is a better match for Forza Motorsport 7 at 1080p. At the same time, Nvidia’s flagship GPU managed the frame rate advantage in 4K. 

This trend continues down the list of cheaper graphics cards from AMD and Nvidia, including the RX Vega 56, which sees higher frame rates than the GTX 1070 Founders Edition in DirectX 12-heavy games like Rise of the Tomb Raider and Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (91 fps vs 89 fps and 40 fps vs 31 fps, respectively), according to PCGamesN

Throw a Grand Theft Auto V into the mix, however, and we’re talking 64 fps on the RX Vega 56 vs 79 fps from the GTX 1070.

Software, drivers and features

One key draw to using Nvidia hardware over AMD is the Green Team’s GeForce Experience software. 

Because it delivers driver updates and optimizes games in addition to letting you broadcast gameplay and capture screenshots as well as videos directly from its easy-to-use interface, Nvidia GeForce Experience is posited as the one PC gaming application to rule them all. 

Meanwhile, AMD’s newly announced Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition aims to overtake Nvidia’s solution.. Previously known as Crimson ReLive, the latest re-skinned update of AMD’s graphics application is stacked with all of the features you’ve grown accustomed to since the UI was massively overhauled back in July, but with the benefit of more consistent updates driver updates to account for every major game release.

As of December 2016, you could already livestream via Radeon Crimson ReLive, but now you can take safety measures to ensure maximum power efficiency while you’re gaming. That includes the ability to underclock memory frequencies, cap frame rates on a hardware level and enable “Enhanced Sync” to decrease frame stutter while it simultaneously combats screen tearing.

Nvidia vs AMD

Still, GeForce Experience has the game optimization features we’re all crazy for. So when you don’t know what settings are best for your computer in The Witcher 3, Nvidia takes care of the heavy lifting for you. 

AMD users can download and install Raptr’s Gaming Evolved tool to optimize their gaming experience. However, the add-on is less than ideal considering its biggest rival’s audience can accomplish nearly everything from within GeForce Experience. That includes using Nvidia Ansel to take way cool in-game photos at resolutions exceeding 63K (16 times that of which a 4K monitor can display).

Nvidia also has a leg up when it comes to streaming games whether it’s to another gaming PC with at least a Maxwell-based GPU, as well as the company’s self-made tablets and set-top box. Not to mention, Nvidia also has a cloud-based gaming service call GeForce Now available to Windows 10 and MacOS users.

Exclusivity

It was once rumored that AMD and Nvidia were enacting shady tactics, “paying off” game developers to show preferential treatment towards one or the other. Were this the case, it would certainly explain why certain games run better using GeForce graphics than Radeon and vice versa. 

Fortunately, we don’t see these concerns from PC gamers as much anymore, but that doesn’t mean they don’t exist. 

Following its Capsaicin & Cream livestream event at GDC 2017, we spoke with AMD its to discuss its strategy in contending with Nvidia. The news that the company would partner with Bethesda Softworks to optimize its games for Radeon, Ryzen or both was worrying to say the least. And it still is. 

At the time, the potential for games operating more smoothly on AMD systems meant that Nvidia could fight back by partnering with an equally large publisher. Although the latter maneuver hasn’t happened yet, early Wolfenstein II performance comparisons, such as this one from TechEpiphany on YouTube have exhibited better performance and lower temps coming from the AMD Radeon RX 64 when pitted against Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1080.

We’re not saying there’s a bias towards AMD in Bethesda’s technical design decisions, however we aren’t ready to take off our tin foil hats quite yet either.

Of course, Bethesda is hardly the only company to show favoritism to either team red or green. If you ever see an AMD or Nvidia splash screen ahead of the title page when you start a game, you can bet it will run better with that company’s hardware.

So, which is better? Neither

There’s so much to love, and in some instances “dis-love,” about both Nvidia and AMD graphics. In the end, both of these companies rely on competition with each other to thrive. Suffice to say, the Nvidia vs AMD debate requires that you understand there’s a reason Radeon and GeForce GPUs are so similar in performance right now. 

Each company is doing its best to keep up with the mindshare of the other, and that’s good for us. They’re basically fighting for our money, learning from each other’s mistakes and legislating marked improvements along the way. 

It’s up to you who wins the fiery contest of Nvidia vs AMD, although we will say this: Nvidia is unmatched in the 4K market right now. If it helps any, the GTX 1080 Ti is your best bet if you want your PC to keep up with the likes of your Ultra HD display. Otherwise, Nvidia and AMD graphics cards are about the same, at least for the time being.

  • These are the best PC games you can play right now

Google’s new DIY kit for Raspberry Pi lets you build your own smart camera

Following the release of its voice control kit earlier this year, Google has produced a new DIY kit for the Raspberry Pi which lets hobbyists turn the compact board into a computer vision system – or in layman’s terms, a smart camera capable of recognizing stuff.

The AIY (do-it-yourself AI) Vision Kit consists of a VisionBonnet circuit board, a lens kit, a button and speaker, along with a cardboard outer case and various connecting bits and pieces (including a tripod mounting nut).

When combined with a Raspberry Pi Zero W, a Raspberry Pi Camera, plus an SD card (and power supply), the user can build their own powerful computer vision system which has no need to hook up to the cloud for extra processing power. It’s a fully self-contained cardboard box of tricks.

The time for assembling the kit is estimated at around an hour.

Recognizing the benefits

It comes with software that can pull off feats like successfully recognizing common objects from a database, and recognizing human faces and their expressions (happy, sad, confused-why-are-you-pointing-that-camera-at-me, that sort of thing).

There’s a third piece of software (all of these utilize TensorFlow-based neural network models) which can be used as a person, cat or dog detector.

So, for example, you could set up a system that detects when a person enters the room, or when your pet appears at the back door, wanting to be let in because it has started raining.

The AIY Vision Kit will be unleashed at the end of this month, retailing at $45 (around £33, AU$60) in the US, with pre-orders now live over at Micro Center.

As we mentioned previously, Google also released an AIY Voice Kit back in May, which has many uses including potentially driving a voice-powered robot, or making your own digital assistant. That’ll set you back £25 (around $34, AU$45) over at Pimoroni.

The Raspberry Pi is nothing if not versatile, and has even been used – in very large quantities – to build a ‘supercomputer’ of sorts.

Via: The Verge

  • Wondering what else you can do with your Raspberry Pi? Check out our projects

Online game from PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds dev let players send malware via in-game chat

Here’s something new (and very worrying) in the world of online gaming: Tera, an MMORPG (massively multiplayer online RPG) produced by the same developer responsible for PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, had its in-game chat shut down over the weekend following revelations that it could be used as a medium to spread all sorts of malicious nastiness including viruses.

Developer Bluehole launched Tera back in 2011 in South Korea, and it followed to North America and Europe in 2012. It’s an online RPG with combat that plays out like an FPS, but panic struck over the weekend when the game servers were brought down for emergency maintenance to fix a gaping chat-related vulnerability.

Players themselves actually highlighted the flaw in Tera’s chat system, which apparently utilizes HTML, and could reportedly be exploited to bombard other players with dodgy images or links, collect user IP addresses, or even remotely execute malware.

As if MMORPG public chat channels weren’t toxic enough already.

The game’s North American publisher, En Masse, noted at the time: “There are very serious claims floating around of what this vulnerability potentially allows malicious users to do. We are taking these claims very seriously but, as of this time, we have no evidence that the vulnerability is being exploited in these ways or that any player information has been compromised.”

Fixing a hole

En Masse investigated the issue in conjunction with Bluehole, resulting in all chat being disabled save for guild chat last Friday, with the fix subsequently being deployed on Saturday at around 8:00 PST time in the US. Gameforge, the EU publisher, applied the fix on Friday at 16:00 UK time, a day earlier.

So the issue was dealt with fairly swiftly, as you’d hope, although by all accounts players had their game settings reset by the hotfix. Still, better that than a surprise virus arriving via a chat channel…

This is definitely a bit of an eye-opener and a cautionary tale for developers everywhere, for sure, in terms of security considerations when it comes to in-game systems.

And of course it’s particularly interesting that while Tera is hardly a big-name game, its developer is a big fish these days, and the force behind the juggernaut PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds.

Via: Engadget

  • Your online gaming will run more smoothly with one of our best graphics cards

Nvidia CEO believes AMD has suffered a ‘great loss’ and Intel is playing GPU catch-up

Nvidia just posted some impressive financial results, and the company is certainly in a buoyant mood, with the CEO taking the time to divulge his thoughts on the recently-revealed AMD and Intel partnership in laptop CPUs, as well as the defection of a key executive from the former to the latter.

The Q3 fiscal results were certainly strong, with Nvidia notching up a record revenue of $2.64 billion (around £2 billion, AU$3.45 billion), an increase of a third compared to a year ago. The firm made big gains with data centers, but surprisingly also experienced a big jump in gaming revenue with a 25% increase year-on-year – flying in the face of analysts’ expectations.

After boasting of bulging coffers, chief executive Jensen Huang talked on the subject of Raja Koduri leaving AMD to become Intel’s senior VP of the Core and Visual Computing Group, with a remit to deliver ‘high-end discrete graphics’. Yes, discrete graphics solutions, not integrated (on-processor) affairs.

As Tom’s Hardware reports, Huang commented: “Yeah, there's a lot of news out there… first of all, Raja leaving AMD is a great loss for AMD, and it's a recognition by Intel probably that the GPU is just incredibly important now.

“The modern GPU is not a graphics accelerator, we just left the letter ‘G’ in there, but these processors are domain-specific parallel accelerators, and they are enormously complex, they are the most complex processors built by anybody on the planet today.”

He goes on to point out that this is exactly why “every major server around the world has adopted Nvidia GPUs.”

Graphic detail

So, there are a couple of things here. First of all, and obviously enough, it’s not surprising that the Nvidia CEO wants to paint Koduri’s departure as a bad thing for AMD, and AMD’s graphics cards, in terms of it being a ‘great loss’.

Also, on the Intel side of the equation, Huang focuses on the company’s need to drive forward with graphics processors as a critical one. And this likely reflects the fact that the mentioned discrete GPUs Intel talked about in its press release welcoming Koduri into the fold is more about targeting heavyweight arenas such as AI and machine learning, rather than anything to do with gaming.

In other words, Intel doing discrete graphics is certainly big news that will make big waves, but not in terms of consumer graphics cards.

Note that Intel has tried its hand at discrete graphics cards in the past – or had brief flirtations would perhaps be a better way of putting it – but you get the sense that it’s truly a serious drive this time around.

Furthermore, Huang took time to comment on AMD and Intel teaming up to make laptop processors with integrated AMD graphics, news which broke earlier this week.

His somewhat rambling comment on the matter was: “And lastly, with respect to the chip that they [Intel and AMD] built together, I think it goes without saying, now that the energy efficiency of Pascal GeForce and the Max-Q design technology and all of the software we have created has really set a new design point for the industry, it is now possible to build a state of the art gaming notebook with the most leading edge GeForce processors, and we want to deliver gaming experiences many times that of a console in 4K and have that be in a laptop that is 18mm thin.

“The combination of Pascal and Max-Q has really raised the bar, and that's really the essence of it.”

In short: Nvidia’s rivals need to do something, because the firm’s latest advances with Max-Q are pushing the notebook graphics envelope so much.

Strong words all round then, but given its current form, Nvidia is unlikely to be short of confidence. Particularly when looking to a future in which graphics processors are key to the likes of supercomputers and cutting-edge fields such as AI and machine learning.

  • These are the best graphics cards you can buy in 2017